Are You a Legal Professional?

Cialis FAQ

Q: What is Cialis?

Cialis (tadalafil) is a prescription medicine used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). Cialis can help men suffering from ED maintain an erection. However, Cialis doesn't cure ED or increase a man's sexual desire. Cialis is made by Eli Lilly and Company, and was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2003.

Q: What is erectile dysfunction (ED)?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a condition where a man cannot get or maintain an erection during sexual arousal.

Q: Does Cialis prevent pregnancy or the spread of sexually transmitted diseases?

No. Cialis neither serves as a male form of birth control nor does it protect a man or his partner from sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.

Q: Has there been any recent news about Cialis?

Yes. In 2005, the FDA issued an alert for men about possible loss of vision after taking Cialis. The loss of vision, called non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), was experienced by a small number of men taking Cialis, Viagra, and Levitra. The FDA advises patients to stop taking these drugs if they begin to experience loss of vision.

Q: Who should not take Cialis?

Patients should avoid Cialis if they take nitrates, use recreational drugs containing alkyl nitrites (popularly referred to as "poppers"), or have been advised by a doctor to avoid sexual activity.

Q: Are there any serious health risks associated with Cialis?

Patients can experience a sudden loss of blood pressure after taking Cialis. This is especially common among patients who take Cialis along with nitrates. Patients suffering from a loss of blood pressure may feel dizzy, faint, or suffer a stroke or heart attack.

Q: What are the side effects associated with Cialis?

Common Cialis side effects include headaches, indigestion, back pain, muscle aches, flushing, and a stuffy or runny nose. Less common side effects include an erection that will not go away (called "priapism") and vision problems.

Q: What should I tell my healthcare professional if I already take Cialis?

You should tell all your healthcare professionals that you take Cialis. If you need emergency medical care for a heart problem, it will be important for your healthcare professionals to know when you last took Cialis.

Q: What should I tell my healthcare professional before he or she prescribes Cialis?

Before using Cialis, you should tell your healthcare professional if you have or had heart problems, have low blood pressure or have high blood pressure that is not controlled, have had a stroke, have liver problems, have kidney problems or require dialysis, have ever had severe vision loss, have retinitis pigmentosa (a rare genetic eye disease), have stomach ulcers, have a bleeding problem, have a deformed penis shape or Peyronie's disease, have had an erection that lasted more than 4 hours, have blood cell problems such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia, or take medicines called "alpha blockers."

Q: Can other medicines or food affect Cialis?

Cialis and certain other medicines can interact with each other. It's important that you tell your healthcare professional about all the medicines you take - including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Q: What should I do if I think I have been injured as a result of taking Cialis?

If you or a loved one has experienced any dangerous symptoms or unusual medical conditions while taking Cialis, you should first contact your doctor or other healthcare professional. You may also want to meet with an experienced attorney to discuss your options and protect your right to a legal remedy for any injuries caused by Cialis use.

Next Steps
Contact a qualified product liability attorney to make sure
your rights are protected.
(e.g., Chicago, IL or 60611)

Help Me Find a Do-It-Yourself Solution